2017-05-16
Georges Leclanche and Alkaline dry cell Battery

Georges Leclanche and Alkaline dry cell Battery

Georges Leclanche (1839 – September 14, 1882) was a French electrical engineer chiefly remembered for his invention of the Leclanché cell, one of the first modern electrical batteries and the forerunner of the modern dry cell battery. Georges Leclanché died on September 14, 1882 in Paris around the age of 43.

In 1866 he invented the Leclanché cell, one of the first electrical batteries and the forerunner of the modern dry cell battery. Within a span of two years, twenty thousand of his cells were being used in the telegraph system.

Leclanche's original cell was assembled in a porous pot. The positive electrode consisted of crushed manganese dioxide with a little carbon mixed in. The negative pole was a zinc rod. The cathode was packed into the pot, and a carbon rod was inserted to act as a currency collector. The anode or zinc rod and the pot were then immersed in an ammonium chloride solution. The liquid acted as the electrolyte, readily seeping through the porous cup and making contact with the cathode material. Leclanche's "wet" cell (as it was popularly referred to) became the forerunner to the world's first widely used battery, the zinc carbon cell.

The Leclanche cell was used extensively for telegraphy, signalling and electric bell work; and for most work where intermittent current is required and where it is essential that the battery should require very little attention. The cell proved very useful in the early years of the telephone, before power was centralised in the exchanges, every telephone needed to have its own source of electricity.